irony

   , ironic
   Irony is a form of expression in which the real meaning is concealed or contradicted by the words or images used — a meaning which either markedly contrasts or is entirely opposite to that which appears to be presented. It is a trope in which there is an incongruity between what might be expected and what actually occurs. Irony involves the perception that things are not what they seem to be. The intention of one who uses irony is usually to imagine that there are two kinds of people in the audience: the first kind will not understand that what they see does not carry the ultimate meaning, and the other is aware that there is more meaning intended, and also that the first kind of person doesn't understand this. Irony is a means of expressing an attitude which is disguised by what what will seems to be obvious. The effect of irony is usually intended to be humorous, dramatic, tragic, insulting (sarcastic), or absurd. Irony is essential to satire. When irony is presented by pretending ignorance, is is the kind also called "Socratic irony." "Ironic" is the adjectival form: relating to, characterized by, using, or containing irony. Also see ambiguity, amphibolous, coherence, incoherence, compare, counterpoint, cryptic, illusion, juxtaposition, metaphor, nuance, parody, point of view, and simile.

Glossary of Art Terms. 2014.

Synonyms:
(saying one thing and meaning the opposite)


Look at other dictionaries:

  • irony — In the ordinary use of language irony means primarily ‘an expression of meaning by use of words that have an opposite literal meaning or tendency’. When we look out of the window at the pouring rain and exclaim ‘What a lovely day!’, we are using… …   Modern English usage

  • irony — irony1 [ī′rə nē, ī′ər nē] n. pl. ironies [Fr ironie < L ironia < Gr eirōneia < eirōn, dissembler in speech < eirein, to speak < IE base * wer , to speak > WORD] 1. a) a method of humorous or subtly sarcastic expression in which… …   English World dictionary

  • Irony — I ron*y, a. [From {Iron}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Made or consisting of iron; partaking of iron; iron; as, irony chains; irony particles; In this sense {iron} is the more common term. [R.] Woodward. [1913 Webster +PJC] 2. Resembling iron in taste,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Irony — I ron*y, n. [L. ironia, Gr. ? dissimulation, fr. ? a dissembler in speech, fr. ? to speak; perh. akin to E. word: cf. F. ironie.] [1913 Webster] 1. Dissimulation; ignorance feigned for the purpose of confounding or provoking an antagonist. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Irony — est un album du rappeur français Iron Sy Liste des titres Président ! Du Berceau Au Tombeau Sale Pote (Feat. Douma) Pas Dans Ton Magazine J suis pas chez moi T Co Q Instincts Criminels J Taf Pas, J Dors Pas C Quoi L Diez (Feat. Boulaye) Ma… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • irony — noun cynicism, dissimulatio, ironia, mockery, sarcasm, satire Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • irony — *wit, satire, sarcasm, humor, repartee …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • irony — [n] sarcasm banter, burlesque, contempt, contrariness, criticism, derision, humor, incongruity, jibe, mockery, mordancy, paradox, quip, raillery, repartee, reproach, ridicule, sardonicism, satire, taunt, twist, wit; concepts 230,278 Ant.… …   New thesaurus

  • irony — ► NOUN (pl. ironies) 1) the expression of meaning through the use of language which normally signifies the opposite, typically for humorous effect. 2) a state of affairs that appears perversely contrary to what one expects. ORIGIN Greek eir neia… …   English terms dictionary

  • Irony — Ironic redirects here. For the song, see Ironic (song). For other uses, see irony (disambiguation). A Stop sign ironically defaced with a beseechment not to deface stop signs Irony (from the Ancient Greek εἰρωνεία eirōneía, meaning dissimulation… …   Wikipedia

  • irony — irony1 /uy reuh nee, uy euhr /, n., pl. ironies. 1. the use of words to convey a meaning that is the opposite of its literal meaning: the irony of her reply, How nice! when I said I had to work all weekend. 2. Literature. a. a technique of… …   Universalium

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